Newseum Opens “The Marines and Tet” Exhibit

The Marines and Tet

Photo by John Olson.

The Newseum’s latest exhibit, “The Marines and Tet: The Battle That Changed the Vietnam War” is open. The innovative exhibit features 20 large-format photographs from the 1968 Tet Offensive and 10 tactile versions of those photographs with touch-activated sensors that provide audio interviews, allowing blind and low-vision visitors to experience the images through touch and sound.The Newseum is the first museum in the United States to host a major tactile exhibit designed to include blind and low-vision visitors. “The Marines and Tet” was developed with generous support from the National Federation of the Blind and Nikon.

“On the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive, this exhibit explores a battle that was a major turning point in the Vietnam War through John Olson’s powerful photographs and the searing stories of the Marines who fought there,” said Cathy Trost, senior vice president of exhibits and programs at the Newseum. “We are excited to present this in an innovative way that offers blind and sighted people new ways to experience history through touch and sound.”

The exhibit features the work of John Olson, a young photographer with Stars and Stripes who spent three days with the Marines at the 1968 Battle of Huêˊ (pronounced hway), the bloodiest single battle of the Vietnam War. Huêˊ was one of more than 100 cities and villages that North Vietnamese forces struck with a surprise attack on the holiday known as Tet. North Vietnamese forces were ultimately pushed back, but the strength and resolve of the enemy stunned the U.S. military and further eroded support for the war on the homefront. Olson’s photographs were featured in Life magazine, and he won the Robert Capa Gold Medal for his work. His image of a tank carrying wounded Marines at the Battle of Huêˊ became one of the most iconic images of the Vietnam War.

“For blind people, living the lives we want includes experiencing works of art and museum exhibits in order to share in the rich history and culture of our nation and the world,” said Mark Riccobono, president of the National Federation of the Blind. “We are pleased and proud to sponsor this first-of-its-kind exhibit at the Newseum.”

“Photography plays a vital role in chronicling history,” said Kosuke Kawaura, director of marketing and planning at Nikon Inc. “Nikon is gratified to continue to support the Newseum and its commitment to outstanding photojournalism, as well as their efforts to make these groundbreaking images accessible to more people than ever before.”

“The Marines and Tet” was produced in partnership with Stars and Stripes, which provides news for America’s military, and 3DPhotoWorks, which converts images to three-dimensional tactile prints.

The exhibit also includes unique artifacts, including Nikon cameras that Olson used in Vietnam and personal items from the Marines, as well as newspapers and magazines that published Olson’s photography. Ten Marines were interviewed for the exhibit, including the battalion and company commanders, some of them revealing their stories publicly for the first time.

Some of the Marines in Olson’s photographs have been identified, but others remain nameless. As part of his mission to identify all the men in the photos, Olson has set up tet1968.com, a website that allows the public to assist with his research and share their stories of Tet.

On Jan. 25, the Newseum hosted a program featuring Olson and Mark Bowden, best-selling author of the book “Huêˊ 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam.” Olson and Bowden were joined by Marines from the battle who are the subjects of Olson’s gripping images, as well as Mark Riccobono, president of the National Federation of the Blind.

Watch the program or view photos from the event.

“The Marines and Tet” will be on display at the Newseum through July 8, 2018.

Stars and Stripes
3D PhotoWorks
“The Marines and Tet” was produced in partnership with Stars and Stripes, which provides news for America’s military, and 3DPhotoWorks, which converts images to three-dimensional tactile prints.
National Federation of the Blind
“The Marines and Tet” was developed with generous support from the National Federation of the Blind and Nikon.

 

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