Professional Development Workshops for Teachers and Educators

The Newseum's workshops for teachers present the First Amendment, history and journalism from a fresh, multi-disciplinary perspective and provide resources and strategies so participants can take what they learn into their own classrooms. The standard workshop length is an hour and a half, but groups can also arrange longer programs including interaction with an archivist and/or guided gallery exploration. Expanded resource bags are also available. For more details on options and pricing, or to book a workshop, please call the education reservation line at 202/292-6650 or write to educationprograms@newseum.org.

Headlines of History Workshops 

Making a Change: The First Amendment and the Civil Rights Movement
This workshop revisits a time period and movement that educators already know well, but poses new questions: How did civil rights activists use the First Amendment to achieve their goals? How did Martin Luther King Jr. harness the power of the news media? Participants view a Newseum-made documentary based on primary sources that invites them to look at the civil rights movement from a different angle and tackle an activity that bridges the gap between social movements then and now. Teachers also receive resources and strategies to bring their new knowledge back to their students.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center or 50 in the Documentary Theater

Revolutionary Freedoms: The Free Press and the Founding of Our Nation
You think today's media is partisan and mean-spirited? This workshop travels back to the days before the First Amendment became law to explore the role – and rancor – of the press in colonial America, throughout the Revolutionary War and during the debates over the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Participants look at early American history from a new angle, learning about early conceptions of freedom of press and individual founding fathers' contributions to the Bill of Rights. They then participate in a hands-on debate over the first significant challenge to the First Amendment: the Alien and Sedition Acts. The workshop ends with the presentation of strategies and resources educators can use in their own classrooms.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center

The Photographic Revolution: The Ethics and Impact of Seeing the Story
From the horror of the battlefield to the squalor of 19th century New York City, a new witness saw all: the camera. Focusing on the examples of Civil War battlefield photography and Jacob Riis' investigation into New York tenement conditions, this workshop introduces participants to the logistical and ethical implications created by new technology. Educators learn about the guiding principles of journalism, the early history of photography, and the origins of modern war reporting and investigative reporting. Through real life case studies, participants connect historical topics to contemporary issues. They also learn about strategies and resources for teaching with historical newspapers and photographs in their classrooms.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center or 50 in the Documentary Theater

The First Amendment, Freedom of Press and the Women's Suffrage Movement
What do you do when the media is ignoring the issues you think are important? When the mainstream press ridiculed or disregarded women fighting for the right to vote, activists put their freedom of press into action and started their own newspapers. This workshop provides an overview of the women's suffrage movement, then looks in depth at examples of three suffrage newspapers. Participants will also analyze how the women's suffrage movement pioneered our modern concepts of how to exercise the other four First Amendment freedoms. A discussion of strategies and resources gives teachers the tools they need to introduce their students to a new perspective on this movement.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center

The Press, the Presidency and Political Cartoons
How "real" is the media's depiction of our nation's leaders? What tools do presidents use to shape their image? In this session, educators will explore the role of the media and president and how the relationship has changed over time. Learn how presidents have used new technologies to control their message and communicate with the public. Participants also debate the role of political cartoons in the media and society and analyze cartoons from throughout this nation's history. They will receive strategies and resources for bringing these topics into their own classrooms.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center

Reporting the Civil War
As the first American-involved conflict covered by professional journalists, the Civil War marked the birth of modern American war reporting, forever changing the nation's expectations for wartime news. This workshop explores the technological advances — and corresponding challenges — that shaped the era's reporting. Discover how the lightning speed of the telegraph revolutionized newspaper coverage of battlefield action and magnified tensions between the press and the military. Learn about the tedious techniques battlefield photographers had to master to capture now-iconic images, and draw connections to modern-day issues as you debate the ethical implications of racing to print the latest scoop on troop positions and strategies. The workshop includes a discussion of resources and strategies for bringing this material into your classrooms. All attendees will receive the Newseum's Civil War front page battlefield map poster to use with their students.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center or 50 in the Documentary Theater
 

The Media and the Cold War
Remember air raid drills and fears of nuclear annihilation? This workshop covers the overwhelming hostility and tensions between the United States and Soviet Union during the early years of the Cold War, and the challenges it placed on journalists to be fair, accurate and clear. Learn how television was just coming of age, and how the U.S. government exploited the newness of the medium to perpetuate fears and misinformation about communism. Participants will examine the role of propaganda and deconstruct a government film, and discuss resources to use in their classrooms.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center or 50 in the Documentary Theater
 

News Without Borders
This program uses three figures in American history — Upton Sinclair, Woodrow Wilson and Richard Nixon — to discuss the impact of media technology on the free flow of information, and the global impact of a free press in different eras. The program familiarizes participants with some of the ethical issues faced by journalists as they work to be accurate, fair and clear, particularly in the context of new media technologies and stories with international repercussions. By examining historic and recent real-life case studies, participants grapple with the dilemmas journalists face in our increasingly small global media world.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants in the Learning Center or 50 in the Documentary Theater

Journalism Workshops 

Media Ethics
The press may be free, but is it a free-for-all? Is it OK to clean up a quote or digitally manipulate a photograph? This workshop teaches educators the key principles of ethical journalism. Using real-life case studies, participants debate how to apply these rules, experiencing first-hand the decision-making process that goes on behind-the-scenes in journalism. They receive tools and strategies that will allow them to take these topics back to their students, helping them become more informed media consumers.

  • Teacher grade level: Middle - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants

Judging Fact, Fiction and Everything in Between: Teaching Media Literacy to "Digital Natives"
Is it ever okay to cite Wikipedia? Is plagiarism still wrong if everybody's doing it? Does it matter who posted a story, video or photograph? From research papers to Facebook profiles, today's students face questions about the origins, reliability, and attribution of information everywhere they turn. As "digital natives" who've been online their whole lives, they have a unique perspective on these issues, but they still need guidance to ask the right questions and find the answers. This workshop introduces teachers to tools they can share with their students to deconstruct the information they encounter online, in print, or on TV. Participants will learn about specific strategies and resources they can bring to their classrooms to foster increased media literacy across subject matters.

  • Teacher grade level: Elementary - High School
  • Capacity: 36 participants

Workshop Components and Costs 

Costs: $50 per person, including admission to the Newseum

Workshops include

  • interactive lesson with a Newseum educator
  • resources and teaching strategies
  • self-guided gallery exploration

*Additional Options:

  • content talk with a subject-matter expert
  • lunch in the Wolfgang Puck Food Section
  • a resource bag filled with books and copies of primary sources

Customized Workshops 

Our curriculum developers can work with you to create a customized professional development program to address your specific content and objectives.  Through our unique prisms of learning we are able to address any point in American history or journalism thoroughly and interactively.

To request a price quote for a customized program, register for a workshop or for more information, please call the education reservation line at 202/292-6650 or write to educationprograms@newseum.org.

*an additional fee applies

    • Tickets to DC's Top Attractions
    • Washington News Museum Annual Pass
    • Today's Front Pages
    • Shop Online
  • Support the Newseum
  • Places to Visit in Washington, DC near the National Mall
  • Press Info
  • General Info
Related Links:
  • Freedom Forum

FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTubeGoogle+
PinterestFlickrFoursquarePodcasttumblr


See what others say about Newseum on TripAdvisor.