Mothers of slain and missing journalists to speak at Newseum

James Foley and Austin Tice

Judy Woodruff moderates a conversation with Debra Tice, whose son Austin went missing in Syria in 2012, and Diane Foley, whose son James was killed by Islamic State militants last August.
Read More

Newseum Podcast Pulitzer Photos Series Continues

Irwin Thompson

This week’s episode features three The Dallas Morning News photographers talking about covering Hurricane Katrina.
Read More

Join us Feb. 1 on Twitter for Follow a Museum Day

Follow a Museum Day

The Newseum is participating in this annual Twitter conversation with hundreds of museums from around the world.
Read More

Special “Newsies” Presale Offer for Newseum Members

Disney NEWSIES

Newseum members, watch your inboxes for an exclusive presale offer to see “Newsies” at the National Theatre this summer!
Read More

Was LBJ a Civil Rights Villain?

1965: Civil Rights at 50

The movie “Selma” has sparked debate among historians and civil rights leaders about the relationship between President Lyndon B. Johnson and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and their roles in the passage of the Voting Rights Act.
Read More

“March: Book Two” featured in Newseum Civil Rights Exhibit

Civil Rights Superhero: An Evening with John Lewis

Rep. John Lewis’s graphic novel-style memoir recounts his experiences in the civil rights movement, including the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., in 1965.
Read More

Collecting, Preserving Memorable Newspapers

Charlie Hebdo

Newseum print news archivist Kathryn Wilmot explains how and why the Newseum acquired copies of Charlie Hebdo and offers tips to new collectors on how to preserve the memento for years to come.
Read More

The End of the Poll Tax

012-03-G49013-FINAL-S

On this day in 1964, the 24th Amendment was passed after it was ratified by South Dakota. While the 15th Amendment protects the rights of all male citizens to vote, many Southern states found ways to make it difficult for poor African-Americans to cast a ballot, including charging a tax to vote and literacy tests. The Supreme Court decided that literacy tests were in fact constitutional in 1898 with Williams v. Mississippi.
Read More

Civil Rights on TV

1965: Civil Rights at 50

Fifty years ago, the civil rights movement in all its glory and brutality was brought to American living rooms through television.
Read More

Newseum Podcast presents Pulitzer Photos series

Damon Winter

Hosts Frank and Sonya take listeners behind the scenes of some of the most iconic photographs in recent history to explore the stories behind the images.
Read More