December 20, 2010

Remembering Journalists We Lost

George Ballis (1925-2010) Courtesy Kay Kepley
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George Ballis (1925-2010) Courtesy Kay Kepley

Paul Conrad (1924-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press
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Paul Conrad (1924-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press

Evelyn Cunningham (1916-2010) Courtesy Evelyn Cunningham
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Evelyn Cunningham (1916-2010) Courtesy Evelyn Cunningham

Harold Dow (1947-2010) Jennifer Graylock/Courtesy The Associated Press
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Harold Dow (1947-2010) Jennifer Graylock/Courtesy The Associated Press

Barbara Greenspun (1922-2010) Courtesy The Greenspun Family
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Barbara Greenspun (1922-2010) Courtesy The Greenspun Family

Ernie Harwell (1918-2010) Courtesy Paul Hurschmann/The Associated Press
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Ernie Harwell (1918-2010) Courtesy Paul Hurschmann/The Associated Press

Bill Hudson (1932-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press
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Bill Hudson (1932-2010) Bill Hudson, right. Courtesy The Associated Press

James J. Kilpatrick (1920-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press
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James J. Kilpatrick (1920-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press

Frank Magid (1931-2010) Courtesy Ronald E. French/RKB Images, Inc.
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Frank Magid (1931-2010) Courtesy Ronald E. French/RKB Images, Inc.

Charles McDowell (1926-2010) Courtesy Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch/Courtesy The Associated Press
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Charles McDowell (1926-2010) Courtesy Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch/Courtesy The Associated Press

Charles Moore (1931-2010) Courtesy Charles Moore
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Charles Moore (1931-2010) Courtesy Charles Moore

John H. Murphy III (1916-2010) Paul Schmick/The Washington Star/D.C. Public Library
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John H. Murphy III (1916-2010) Paul Schmick/The Washington Star/D.C. Public Library

Edwin Newman (1919-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press
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Edwin Newman (1919-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press

Dave Niehaus (1935-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press
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Dave Niehaus (1935-2010) Courtesy The Associated Press

Pius Njawé (1957-2010) Themba Hadebe/Courtesy The Associated Press
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Pius Njawé (1957-2010) Themba Hadebe/Courtesy The Associated Press

Daniel Schorr (1916-2010) Mark Lennihan/Courtesy The Associated Press
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Daniel Schorr (1916-2010) Mark Lennihan/Courtesy The Associated Press

Roberto Suarez (1928-2010) Courtesy Miami Herald Media Company
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Roberto Suarez (1928-2010) Courtesy Miami Herald Media Company

They were chroniclers of the struggle for civil and human rights and pioneers in news. Some were household names, and others were recognizable only through their work. As 2010 comes to an end, the Newseum recognizes notable men and women who passed away this year and whose contributions to journalism will not be forgotten.

George Ballis (1925-2010)
George Ballis's powerful images of California's migrant farmworkers galvanized the labor movement and put human faces on their struggle for better conditions. He took more than 30,000 photos of United Farm Workers union leader Cesar Chavez and captured the migrants' dignity, despite their daunting hardships. "I wanted my photographs to reflect to them the power and dignity they had," he said.

Paul Conrad (1924-2010)
"Nobody tells me what to draw," Paul Conrad once told his prospective bosses at the Los Angeles Times. And for much of his 30 years at the daily, they didn't. The three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist was a staunch liberal whose unrelentingly crusade against social injustice brought the Times to national prominence. His distinctive cartoons held little or no words. "Don't ever accuse me of being objective," he said.

Evelyn Cunningham (1916-2010)
Evelyn Cunningham so doggedly pursued dangerous civil rights stories that she was called the "lynching editor." The Pittsburgh Courier reporter once called Birmingham, Ala., police commissioner and segregationist Eugene "Bull" Connor "sir" while covering the city's civil rights struggle. "I was a little ashamed of that, but this man was capable of calling the dogs on me. … I didn't anticipate he would give me the interview. But as a reporter, I had to give it a shot."

Harold Dow (1947-2010)
In 1968, Harold Dow received death threats as the first black TV reporter in Omaha, Neb. When he retired from CBS News after nearly 40 years, the Emmy Award-winning correspondent was the recipient of several awards for distinguished reporting. He exhaustively covered the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York and barely escaped one of the falling towers. "People couldn't get enough information. All the media responded in good fashion. Everyone should be proud of that," he said.

Barbara Greenspun (1922-2010)
In 1950 when her husband, Hank Greenspun, purchased the newspaper that would become the Las Vegas Sun, Barbara Greenspun worried about the paper's survival. The newspaper novice learned everything she could about the business, working behind the scenes while Hank crusaded against power abusers. "I was perfectly content with that role," she said. She became publisher when he died in 1989. The paper won its first Pulitzer Prize in 2009.

Ernie Harwell (1918-2010)
For 42 years, generations of Detroit Tigers fans grew up listening to Ernie Harwell deliver the play-by-play. His homespun delivery and humorous catchphrases made him a beloved Detroit institution. He started each season reading from the Song of Solomon and called more than 8, 300 major league games. "Thank you for sneaking your transistors under the pillow as you grew up loving the Tigers," he said in his final sign-off in 2002.

Bill Hudson (1932-2010)
Associated Press photographer Bill Hudson's 1963 photo of a police dog mauling a 17-year-old demonstrator in Birmingham, Ala., remains one of the iconic images of the civil rights era. The photograph, which appeared on several newspaper front pages across the country, helped awaken the nation to the brutalities of the struggle for civil rights. Segregationists opposed Hudson's efforts. "Sometimes people were throwing rocks and bricks at him," his wife said.

James J. Kilpatrick (1920-2010)
James Kilpatrick was one of the best-known conservative columnists in the post-World War II era. He became a full-time pundit in 1966 after a long career at the Richmond News Leader. In 1975, he teamed up with liberal journalist Shana Alexander for the "Point-Counterpoint" segment on "60 Minutes." Once on a different program, he was asked to take the conservative's view of Watergate. "I asked myself, 'Just what is a conservative's view of burglary?'"

Frank Magid (1931-2010)
From his office in Marion, Iowa, in the 1970s, media consultant Frank Magid and his associates pioneered television's "action news" format, revolutionizing the way broadcast news was thereafter delivered. Magid advised local and national TV clients, examining everything from an anchor's "look" to the issues a station covered. "Our interest is not to make the news director at a station any less," said Magid. "It's to make him a lot more."

Charles R. McDowell (1926-2010)
As a longtime panelist on "Washington Week in Review," Richmond Times-Dispatch syndicated columnist Charlie McDowell was a contrast in style to his fellow panelists. "I think they were looking for a designated provincial," he joked. The veteran journalist covered everything from politics to sports and popular culture. His Southern drawl was one of the voices viewers heard in Ken Burns's critically acclaimed PBS documentaries on the Civil War and Major League Baseball.

Charles Moore (1931-2010)
Charles Moore's graphic images of the civil rights struggle helped define the brutality and inhumanity of racial segregation. Through Moore's lens, the world saw police dogs viciously attack black protesters, water hoses pinning helpless teenagers against a wall and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. being roughed up and arrested by police. "I photographed it, and the world rushed in. … I wanted to show how awful, how vulgar, how terrible this whole thing was," he said.

John H. Murphy III (1916-2010)
John H. Murphy was the third-generation newspaper publisher of one of the country's most influential black newspapers, the Afro-American. With Afro-American newspapers in his hometown of Baltimore and in Washington, D.C., Murphy packaged news for black readers using mainstream newspaper features as models. "He felt very strongly that with knowledge of what was going on, he could bring black people into the mainstream of things," his wife said.

Edwin Newman (1919-2010)
In his more than 30 years at NBC News, Edwin Newman had done it all. He was a correspondent, foreign bureau chief, "Today" show anchor, drama critic and host of the program "Speaking Freely." He moderated two presidential debates and wrote two popular books on the English language. The no-nonsense wordsmith also was known for his whimsical humor — he once poked fun at himself on "Saturday Night Live." "News is a great business," he once said. "I count myself lucky to be in it."

Dave Niehaus (1935-2010)
Dave Niehaus was the play-by-play voice of the Seattle Mariners from the team's first game in April 1977 through the 2010 season. The Hall of Fame announcer never called a World Series game but announced more than 5,000 games for Seattle, often using his trademark "My, oh my!" when a Mariner made a spectacular play. "All of us in this business … this is the toy department of life," he said.

Pius Njawé (1957-2010)
Cameroonian newspaper editor Pius Njawé was one of Africa's most prominent and fearless journalists and a staunch proponent of press freedom. He founded Le Messager in 1979 when he was 22 and set the standard for vigorous, independent-minded journalism in sub-Saharan Africa. Njawé was repeatedly harassed, detained and imprisoned for publishing critical reports about Cameroon's authoritarian regime. "A word can be more powerful than a weapon," he said a month before his death.

Daniel Schorr (1916-2010)
Veteran broadcast journalist Daniel Schorr called himself a living history book, an apt description for a reporter who has covered many of the world's most historic events. One of the last of Edward R. Murrow's legendary "Murrow Boys," Schorr's unrelenting and thorough political reporting garnered the CIA's wrath and landed him on President Richard M. Nixon's "Enemies List." "It really is true that I would sometimes stand up for principle at the risk of my job," he said in a 2009 interview on NPR.

Roberto Suarez (1928-2010)
Roberto Suarez's journalism career began in 1961 in the mail room of The Miami Herald. When he retired nearly 35 years later, the Cuban immigrant was president emeritus of The Miami Herald Publishing Company and publisher of El Nuevo Herald, the Spanish-language newspaper he founded in 1987. "By giving the community an independent voice, he helped it grow and define itself," said Alberto Ibarguen, president of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Many of these journalists are featured in Newseum galleries and exhibits. They are honored separately from those who were killed in 2010 trying to report the news. For a preliminary list of those journalists, visit the Journalists Memorial.

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