“Louder Than Words”

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Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics

“Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics”

“Louder Than Words” explores the crucial influence of rock and roll in politics and social movements around the world.
Maria Bryk/Newseum

Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics

“Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics”

“Louder Than Words” explores the crucial influence of rock and roll in politics and social movements around the world.
Maria Bryk/Newseum

Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics

“Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics”

“Louder Than Words” explores the crucial influence of rock and roll in politics and social movements around the world.
Maria Bryk/Newseum

Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics

“Louder Than Words: Rock, Power and Politics”

“Louder Than Words” explores the crucial influence of rock and roll in politics and social movements around the world.
Maria Bryk/Newseum

Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Guitar

Jimi Hendrix played this 1968 Fender Stratocaster at the Woodstock Festival on Aug. 18, 1969.
Courtesy of the Museum of Pop Culture, Seattle, Wash.

101112-01ROC

Joe Strummer’s 1966 Fender Telecaster

This guitar was Joe Strummer’s principal instrument. He played it in the studio while with the Clash and throughout his solo career. After he acquired the guitar in the early 1970s, Strummer took the guitar to an auto-body shop, where he had it spray painted with gray primer.
Collection of Lucinda Strummer

pressinfo_dl_ltw_nwa_fbi

Letter from the FBI to Priority Records, Aug. 1, 1989

The hip-hop group N.W.A. released the groundbreaking album, “Straight Outta Compton,” in 1988. The album reflected the rising anger of urban youth and addressed themes such as police brutality and racial profiling, especially on the tracks “Straight Outta Compton” and “Fuck tha Police.” The explicit and anti-establishment nature of their lyrics banned them from many mainstream U.S. radio stations and drew the attention of high-level law enforcement.
Collection of Priority Records

090220-01ROC

Bruce Springsteen Outfit and Hat, 1984

Bruce Springsteen wore this outfit on the cover of “Born in the U.S.A.”
Collection of Bruce Springsteen

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Sam Cooke’s Kumalae Ukulele

Because of its compact size and portability, Cooke used this ukulele to compose while on the road.
Gift of Mr. L.C. Cooke, Mr. Allen Klein and the ABKCO Music & Records Family

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

John Lennon’s 1964 Gibson J 160E

John Lennon used this guitar extensively throughout his career. It was prominently seen in the film “Help!” Lennon and Yoko Ono held two “bed-ins” for peace in March and May of 1969, which Lennon commemorated by drawing caricatures of Yoko and himself on the guitar. It was during the second bed-in, held at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, that the single “Give Peace a Chance” was recorded, using this guitar.
Collection of the Estate of John Lennon

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Aretha Franklin Hat, 2009 (replica)

Aretha Franklin went to Luke Song’s shop in her hometown of Detroit looking for a hat to wear for her performance at the inauguration of President Barack Obama on Jan. 20, 2009. “She was looking for something stylish, but mostly she wanted something that would keep her warm,” said Song, who has been making women’s dress hats for 25 years. This is an exact replica of Franklin’s inauguration hat, which is customized with Swarovski crystals and retailed for $179.
Collection of Mr. Song Millinery