civil rights

MLK’s ’63 Letter Reverberates Today

“Make Some Noise”

Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail” holds a message for critics of national anthem boycotts and Black Lives Matter protests.
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National Urban League presents “State of Black America” report at Newseum

State of Black America

The annual report included a 40-year retrospective and outlined a plan for a sweeping and decisive solution to the nation’s persistent social and economic disparities.
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Black Panthers at 50

Stokely Carmichael

Explore black history month at the Newseum, with artifacts, exhibits, videos and the compelling story of the birth of the Black Panther Party.
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The Watts Riots

The Watts Riots

Fifty years ago on Aug. 11, 1965, in Los Angeles’s Watts neighborhood, the arrest of a black motorist caused a melee that sparked six days of deadly riots, ushering in a new era of racial unrest.
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Unsung Heroes: Farmville Student Strike

Brown v. Board was a collection of five cases; all of them focused on the constitutionality of state-sponsored segregation in public schools. Davis v. Board of Education of Prince Edward County (VA) was one of the five cases and it started with students.
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Unsung Heroes: Integrating Professional Football

When Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947, baseball was changed forever. However, professional football had a history of integration and re-integration well before Robinson stepped on the field.
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The End of the Poll Tax

On this day in 1964, the 24th Amendment was passed after it was ratified by South Dakota. While the 15th Amendment protects the rights of all male citizens to vote, many Southern states found ways to make it difficult for poor African-Americans to cast a ballot, including charging a tax to vote and literacy tests. The Supreme Court decided that literacy tests were in fact constitutional in 1898 with Williams v. Mississippi.
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