There’s more to every story

#Ferguson, #FirstAmendment

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Something more than fires and rage has been sparked in the streets of Ferguson. The First Amendment, like the city, is now a rallying cry and a hashtag for protesters exercising their rights to peaceably assemble and to petition the government.
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Washington Monument Completed

Washington Monument Completed

On Dec. 6, 1884, after 36 years of delays and interruptions caused by politics, a lack of funds and the Civil War, the Washington Monument in the nation’s capital was finally completed.
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60 Years of ‘Face the Nation’

Bob Schieffer

A bipartisan list of politicians, media stars and special guests gathered at the Newseum Nov. 17 to celebrate the 60th anniversary of CBS News’s long-running Sunday news program, “Face the Nation.”
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The Birth of Press Freedom

One Nation With News for All

On Nov. 17, 1734, before there was a First Amendment, newspaper publisher John Peter Zenger became a free-press hero when he was jailed for printing truthful articles in his New-York Weekly Journal accusing British Colonial governor William Cosby of being corrupt.
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Around the World With Nellie Bly

Nellie Bly

On Nov. 14, 1889, Nellie Bly, one of the world’s first female reporters and the New York World’s intrepid “stunt girl,” embarked on an ambitious mission to circle the globe in less time than Phileas Fogg, the hero of Jules Verne’s novel “Around the World in Eighty Days.” It was her latest attempt to dazzle readers and keep Joseph Pulitzer’s No. 1 daily on top of the newspaper world.
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25 Years Ago: The Berlin Wall Crumbled

Fall of the Berlin Wall

On the night of Nov. 9, 1989, the Berlin Wall came down. East German authorities opened the border between East and West Berlin and the door to the fall of tyranny. The wall went up in the early morning darkness of Aug. 13, 1961, to keep millions of people from fleeing communist East Germany after World War II. It fell as suddenly as it had been built.
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“The original broadcast that panicked the nation!”

War of the Worlds

Going viral” might seem like a modern, Internet-era concept, but Orson Welles and CBS Radio mastered it 76 years ago this week.
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Ben Bradlee’s Press Pass

Ben Bradlee’s press pass

Presses passes — held in a hand or slung around the neck — give journalists front-row seats at the events that shape our times. The events end, but the press passes remain, like Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee’s press pass from 1972.
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International Days of Protest

draft card

The First Amendment took center stage in anti-war demonstrations 49 years ago this week, as the first draft card was burned in public amid nationwide protests decrying U.S. involvement in the escalating Vietnam conflict.
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The 1960 Presidential Debate

John F Kennedy and Richard Nixon’s presidential debate

54 years ago, on Sept. 26, 1960, over 65 million viewers tuned in to watch the first televised presidential debate in American history.
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